Evelyn Brody in the Gallery

By Sam Brunson

Evelyn Brody with her painting “When in French”

Have you ever wondered what tax professors do when they’re not doing tax? In the case of Evelyn Brody (Chicago-Kent College of Law), one answer is art.

I’m sure most people who read this blog are familiar with Evelyn’s academic work, but if you’re not, she teaches and writes broadly in the income tax and nonprofit law areas. She also paints.

And when I say paints,” I mean it. Almost two weeks ago, she opened “Suspended Animation,” an exhibition of her pastels at the Leslie Wolfe Gallery. This afternoon I went to the reception she hosted at the gallery. Continue reading “Evelyn Brody in the Gallery”

Every Old Scam is New Again

Michael Schvo's "Sheep Station." Photo by Inhabitat. Used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 licence.
“Sheep Station.” Photo by Inhabitat. Used under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 licence.

When I was in law school, I took a class in state and local taxation from Professor Richard Pomp. Although I don’t spend much of my professional life thinking about state taxes, I clearly remember one of the stories he told us.

A fur store in Manhattan, he told us, would ship empty boxes (or boxes filled with rocks or magazines) to an empty lot in New Jersey for customers. Why? Because nonresident purchasers didn’t have to pay New York sales tax if the purchase was shipped out of state.[fn1]

The New York Times provides more detail on the scheme: the furrier in question, Ben Thylan Furs Corporation, would allow customers to take the furs home without paying sales tax (and, with an average fur price of $8,700, the evasion of an 8.25% sales tax saved customers an average of $717.75 per fur). It would then ship a box filled with something else (or with nothing) to create a false record to back the out-of-state purchase. And, in 1985, Ben Thylan was indicted.  Continue reading “Every Old Scam is New Again”